The Secret to Great Sex after Spinal Cord Injury

In the aftermath of a spinal cord injury there are many questions. Will I ever walk again? Will I ever feel anything again? Will I be able to enjoy all the things I once did? And oh yeah, Will I be able to have sex again? That last question is sometimes a bit uncomfortable for the doctors and nurses to answer but it’s a valid question non-the-less. Some facts on Spinal Cord Injury: 250,000 Americans are spinal cord injured. 82% are Male 56% of... [Read More...]

Paraplegic Sex is a Reality

Paraplegic sex is a reality for many men and women with today’s advances in adaptive technology and in how society now understands the healthy emotional benefits of paraplegic sex.  Many myths about paraplegic sex have been brought to light and adaptive products like the IntimateRider (www.intimaterider.com) are making paraplegic sex a reality. Paraplegic sex does not end when a person experiences the effects of a spinal cord injury.  Issues of... [Read More...]

Liberator™ Wedge for Disabled Women

IntimateRider has partnered with Liberator to bring you products that will work for you if you are living with a disability. The Liberator Wedge works well for women who have a disability.  With a 27 degree angle the Liberator Wedge can support your body and help you improve your angle when trying different positions. Liberator Wedge: has foam that will support two bodies has a silky smooth liner that protects the Liberator Wedge has a microfiber... [Read More...]

5 Disability Sex Tips

Here are 5 disability sex tips to help ease anxiety and increase pleasure and intimacy when engaging in disability sex.   Relax. When you experiment with disability sex, it’s useful to be in a relaxed and sexual frame of mind. This will help you laugh off anything that goes wrong, while gaining the maximum benefit from your exploration of the sexual possibilities open to you during disability sex. Stay within your natural range of flexibility:... [Read More...]

Societies View on Sex and Disability

People with physical or intellectual disabilities in our society are often regarded as non-sexual adults.  Sex is very much associated with youth and physical attractiveness, and when it is not, is often seen as “unseemly”. If sex and disability are discussed, it is very much in terms of capacity, technique, and fertility – in particular, male capacity and technique and female fertility—with no reference to sexual feelings. ... [Read More...]

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